Heat stress on your lawn can become a significant issue during the summer months. Hot, dry weather is the perfect climate for heat stress to affect your lawn. Luckily there are several types of ways that you can prevent heat stress from happening on your lawn.

The first way to prevent heat stress on your lawn is by learning how to diagnose it. We will discuss how to diagnose heat stress on your lung throughout this article so that you can resolve the issue quickly.

How to diagnose heat stress

Diagnosing heat stress on your lawn is quick and easy to do. If you diagnose heat stress early on, you can take measures to prevent your lawn from worsening. The following are clear indicators that your lawn is suffering from heat stress.

  • If you step in your grass and the grass lays flat instead of returning upright once you lift your foot, this can indicate that your lawn is experiencing heat stress.
  • Yellow and brown grass is also a clear indicator that your lawn has heat stress. You made Otis as you drive around that although lines during the summertime have yellow-brown grass. It is common for lawns to experience heat stress during the summer months.
  • Your soil can be a clear indicator that your lawn has heat stress also. The soil on lines that suffer from heat stress is difficult to penetrate with an object because the soil is so hard. However, if your soil is at the correct moisture level, inserting objects into the soil is easy.

Diagnosing heat stress in your lawn can only take a few minutes, and it’s excellent to diagnose before things get worse. Unfortunately, heat stress won’t go away without getting worse first. Fortunately, heat stress is not difficult to treat.

Fixing a Lawn Suffering from Heat Stress

Once you’ve diagnosed your lawn with heat stress, the next thing you need to do is treat the heat stress, so it doesn’t worsen. Heat stress can completely ruin the appearance of your landscape. The following are steps that you can take to fix a lawn suffering from heat stress.

  • Employ thorough yet spaced-out watering sessions. You should only water your lawn a maximum of three times a week. It’s also important to keep track of the weather to ensure that the user doesn’t water the lawn too often during a rainy week.
  • When you mow your lawn, keep the grass strains over an inch and a half in height. If you mow your grass too low, you can cause further damage to your lawn which is not ideal when your lawn has heat stress.
  • Overseed your lawn to thicken it out and improve its overall look. Overseeding can give you a thicker, healthier-looking lawn and combat damage from heat stress.
  • If the heat stress is severe in your lawn, you should allow your lawn to go dormant. Eventually, your lawn will recover fully.

Final Thoughts on Diagnosing Heat Stress

diagnosing heat stress is easy and is a great way to prevent further damage to your lawn. Heat stress is prevalent during the summer months because the atmosphere is dry and hot. To identify heat stress in your lawn, you can follow the tips in this article.

Texas is no stranger to droughts and dry lawns, and even in the wettest years, there are times when your lawn may dry out to the point of dehydration, which can end up damaging or even killing your lawn. It can happen from the daily heat, or it can happen as a result of even slight inattentiveness to the lawn’s needs.

Being able to tell when your lawn needs water and when it might be beneficial to make your grass tough it out is crucial for having a healthy lawn, year-round. Just watering periodically won’t be enough, here is everything you need to know about recognizing dehydration in your lawn, and what to do about it.

How To Tell If Your Lawn Is Dehydrated

You don’t have to be a botanist to tell if your lawn is a little dry. Some common indicators of a lawn that’s becoming dehydrated include:

  1. The footprint test. Step on a patch of your grass and see if the blades spring back up after a short while. If the footprint persists, your lawn is drying.
  2. Soil becoming crisp or shrinking away from edges is a sign of dehydration.
  3. Push a screwdriver into the soil and see how easily it penetrates. If the soil is too dry, the penetration will require significant effort.
  4. Keep an eye out for patchiness or dead spots on your lawn. This may be due to pests like grubs, but it can also be indicative of dehydration.

Preventing Dehydration…With A Little Dehydration

It might sound counterintuitive but watering your lawn in a cyclical pattern, allowing it to dry out a bit in between watering, helps it to push roots deeper. These deeper roots are insurance against dehydration during dry spells by giving the grass the ability to reach deeper moisture in the ground.

When Watering Works

Be sure you only water during the early morning or late evening, when the sun isn’t going to be beating down on your lawn, evaporating all the water. Water heavily in the early morning or late evening, and the water will have a chance to soak deeper into the soil.

Don’t Cut Too Often

Even if your grass grows quickly, be sure you don’t mow too often, particularly in the heat of midday. Cutting the grass and subsequently subjecting those tender, freshly-sliced blades to the midday sun of the Lone Star State can worsen the condition of the lawn by opening it up too much more evaporation, as well as increased stress.

Still Thirsty? Talk To A Pro

Sometimes, no matter what measures you take and how careful you are, you may not be able to keep your lawn from getting dehydrated. If you’re finding that even with being attentive to your lawn’s needs, watering carefully, and not cutting it too often that it is still looking a little dry, it might be time to work with a professional. Reach out to a local lawn care expert, and they will work with you to find a solution that keeps your lawn healthy and beautiful.