Heat stress on your lawn can become a significant issue during the summer months. Hot, dry weather is the perfect climate for heat stress to affect your lawn. Luckily there are several types of ways that you can prevent heat stress from happening on your lawn.

The first way to prevent heat stress on your lawn is by learning how to diagnose it. We will discuss how to diagnose heat stress on your lung throughout this article so that you can resolve the issue quickly.

How to diagnose heat stress

Diagnosing heat stress on your lawn is quick and easy to do. If you diagnose heat stress early on, you can take measures to prevent your lawn from worsening. The following are clear indicators that your lawn is suffering from heat stress.

  • If you step in your grass and the grass lays flat instead of returning upright once you lift your foot, this can indicate that your lawn is experiencing heat stress.
  • Yellow and brown grass is also a clear indicator that your lawn has heat stress. You made Otis as you drive around that although lines during the summertime have yellow-brown grass. It is common for lawns to experience heat stress during the summer months.
  • Your soil can be a clear indicator that your lawn has heat stress also. The soil on lines that suffer from heat stress is difficult to penetrate with an object because the soil is so hard. However, if your soil is at the correct moisture level, inserting objects into the soil is easy.

Diagnosing heat stress in your lawn can only take a few minutes, and it’s excellent to diagnose before things get worse. Unfortunately, heat stress won’t go away without getting worse first. Fortunately, heat stress is not difficult to treat.

Fixing a Lawn Suffering from Heat Stress

Once you’ve diagnosed your lawn with heat stress, the next thing you need to do is treat the heat stress, so it doesn’t worsen. Heat stress can completely ruin the appearance of your landscape. The following are steps that you can take to fix a lawn suffering from heat stress.

  • Employ thorough yet spaced-out watering sessions. You should only water your lawn a maximum of three times a week. It’s also important to keep track of the weather to ensure that the user doesn’t water the lawn too often during a rainy week.
  • When you mow your lawn, keep the grass strains over an inch and a half in height. If you mow your grass too low, you can cause further damage to your lawn which is not ideal when your lawn has heat stress.
  • Overseed your lawn to thicken it out and improve its overall look. Overseeding can give you a thicker, healthier-looking lawn and combat damage from heat stress.
  • If the heat stress is severe in your lawn, you should allow your lawn to go dormant. Eventually, your lawn will recover fully.

Final Thoughts on Diagnosing Heat Stress

diagnosing heat stress is easy and is a great way to prevent further damage to your lawn. Heat stress is prevalent during the summer months because the atmosphere is dry and hot. To identify heat stress in your lawn, you can follow the tips in this article.

We often take great care to make our yards look awesome. Sometimes we do that for ourselves and other times we do that for others who might see them. Maybe it’s even a little bit of both. Unfortunately, we go to all of this effort but then the cold weather strikes and it does more harm than good.

Shrubs are not a plant that you can just bring inside for the winter. This means that they often are exposed to winter weather that can leave behind damage to shrubs.

Let’s take a quick look at how to recognize winter damage and what you can do about it.

What Causes Winter Damage to Shrubs?

There is more than one way that winter can wreak havoc on your shrubs. In fact, you can have a mild winter and still experience damage from the cold. This happens in warm climates that see little to no freezing temperatures just as much as hearty winters in other locations.

These are the main types of winter damage.

●     Desiccation

●     Frost

●     Sunscald

Desiccation is primarily caused by your shrub becoming dehydrated. Whether the shrub needs water or has lost water, it’s lacking moisture. Things like wind, dry air, and ice can quickly pull the moisture out of the shrub. The signs include dry brown leaves as well as the growth that appears shriveled.

Frost is more likely to damage growth. This might be leaves or new growth. The frost can be harsh on delicate parts of the shrub, leaving it to turn black or brown and even crisp.

Sunscald comes from sunlight exposure. It’s not the same as the summertime sun. The winter sun is brighter and strong on the shrub. This can lead to white damage on the shrub. However, it might also cause withering and brown spots.

Shrubs will be more susceptible to damage when they don’t get the chance to become dormant. However, winter simply works a number on them.

Winter Care

Winter is the time for your plants to be dormant. You can water your shrub on occasion to help it retain some moisture but you won’t want to do this a lot.

The best thing to do when you notice winter damage to shrubs is to simply let it be through the winter. Pruning shrubs in the winter might actually expose them to more harm and cause additional damage.

Simply let the plant experience the winter and plan to have some pruning done in the spring. While your shrub might look a little sad now, they typically recover well with proper spring care.

StreamLine Designs Shrub Care

When winter is over and you’re ready to have your shrubs cared for, we can help. We will be happy to prune your winter-damaged shrub when spring comes. In some cases, your shrub may need some additional care. Our experts can help get the shrub back to a healthy condition.

Don’t be alarmed by a little bit of winter damage. Shrubs typically recover well. Give it some time and let’s see how the spring goes.